Westminster, MD Dentist
Gallagher & Eden Family Dentistry
715 Baltimore Blvd.
Westminster, MD 21157
(410) 848-3866
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By Dr. Patrick Gallagher, D.D.S.
September 23, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: tads  
AnchorageDevicescanaddStabilityDuringOrthodonticTreatment

Braces are certainly the most recognized means for moving misaligned teeth. But depending on your or your family member’s particular malocclusion (bad bite), your orthodontist may also include other “anchorage” appliances to achieve the best results.

We can move teeth because of a mechanism that already exists in the mouth. The periodontal ligament, which holds teeth in place by attaching the tooth surface to the jawbone, allows teeth to move if needed in response to biting forces or normal tooth wear. Using braces or similar appliances, orthodontists can apply gentle but constant pressure to move teeth to new and better positions.

This applied pressure, however, soon encounters an “equal and opposite reaction,” in accordance with Newton’s third law of motion. In a way, we’re playing tug-of-war with the periodontal ligament — and as in the playground game, the key to “winning” is having the stronger point of resistance, something we call anchorage.

We often use the teeth themselves to establish this anchorage with the help of elastics (rubber bands) attached at various locations in the braces. Sometimes, though, the situation requires a different form of anchorage. In a younger patient, for example, we may want to influence the facial structure’s growth and development along with tooth movement. In this case we might use the patient’s skull for additional anchorage by having a strap running around the back of the head that attaches to brackets affixed to the teeth.

Another method involves a temporary anchorage device (TAD) directly implanted into the jawbone. We use TADs to isolate teeth we want under pressure from teeth we don’t (as with moving front teeth back without causing the back teeth to move forward). Usually made of stainless steel that won’t fuse with bone, TADs are relatively simple to remove once treatment is complete. Another form of anchorage is a titanium micro-implant, a miniature version of a dental implant that’s also inserted into the bone; like its larger relative, micro-implants fuse with the bone to add greater stability. Their diminutive size, however, eases any difficulty in their eventual removal.

Though some of these appliances aren’t visually appealing, they are temporary in nature and only applied for as long as needed. The end result, though, is permanent — beautifully aligned teeth that perform well and look great.

If you would like more information on orthodontic appliances, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.

By Dr. Patrick Gallagher, D.D.S.
September 08, 2014
Category: Oral Health
TaylorHicksIShouldHaveWornaMouthguard

Some train intensively for months ahead of time, so they can achieve peak performance during the season; others simply enjoy occasional pick-up games with friends. But here’s something all athletes, both amateurs and professionals, should know: Dental accidents in sports can happen at any time, and the consequences of not wearing the proper protective equipment can be serious.

Don’t believe us? Just ask American Idol season 5 winner Taylor Hicks. Before his singing career took off, Hicks was a high-school basketball star; he lost his two front teeth during a championship game.

“It was just one of those collisions that happen in sports,” Hicks recently told Dear Doctor magazine. “I never wore a mouthguard in basketball. Obviously I should have.”

We agree. And we want to remind you that basketball isn’t the only game that poses a risk to your teeth (although statistics show it’s the leading cause of sports-related dental injuries). Soccer, bike riding, and equestrian sports — along with some two dozen other games and physical activities — are all on the American Dental Association’s list of sports in which participants should wear a mouthguard.

What’s the best kind of mouthguard? The answer is: the one you actually wear. For the maximum comfort and protection, there’s nothing like a custom-fitted mouthguard provided by our office. This is a piece of protective equipment that’s individually crafted just for you — in fact, it’s made from a model of you own teeth! Not only will it fit your mouth perfectly, but it’s also strong, lightweight and easy to wear.

It’s true that off-the-shelf mouthguards are available from big-box retailers in limited sizes (like small, medium and large); also available are the so-called “boil and bite” types, which you soften in hot water before molding them into shape with the pressure of your fingers, teeth and tongue. Either one of these options is probably better than nothing — but neither provides the level of protection and comfort that a custom-made mouthguard offers.

When you consider the potential cost of tooth replacement — not just its hefty price tag, but also the lost time, trouble and inconvenience it can cause — we think you’ll agree that a perfectly fitted mouthguard, made by our office, is a piece of sports equipment you really can’t afford to do without. Best of all, its cost is quite reasonable.

So if you’re the active type, come in to ask us about fitting you with a custom mouthguard. For more information, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Athletic Mouthguards” and “An Introduction to Sports Injuries & Dentistry.”

By Dr. Patrick Gallagher, D.D.S.
August 29, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   oral cancer  
OvercomeOralCancerWithScreeningsandLifestyleChanges

Baseball legend Babe Ruth, President Ulysses S. Grant and George Harrison of the Beatles — these three notable people from different backgrounds and historical eras have a sad commonality — they all died from oral cancer. They are a reminder that regardless of one’s wealth or fame, no one is immune from oral cancer and its deadly effects.

Like other cancers, oral cancer is characterized by abnormal cell growth capable of spreading into nearby tissue or other parts of the body. Although oral cancer accounts for less than 3% of all occurring cancers, it’s among the most deadly: only 58% of oral cancer patients survive five years after treatment. This is mostly due to the difficulty of detecting oral cancer in its early stages; in fact, 30% of oral cancers have already spread (metastasized) when they’re finally diagnosed.

Early detection through careful monitoring is the best strategy for defeating oral cancer. If you have a predisposing factor like a family history of oral cancer, then regular screenings during dental checkups are a must. During an exam we may be able to detect abnormalities (like unusual white spots on the gums or jaws) that may signal a cancer in a pre-cancerous or early stage. You also should be on the lookout for a persistent sore throat or hoarseness, lingering mouth pain, a painless lump in the mouth or on the neck, or ear pain on only one side.

There are also conditions or behaviors that may increase your risk for oral cancer, like using tobacco (both smoke and smokeless) or consuming alcohol. If you use tobacco you should consider quitting it altogether; you should consider cutting back on alcohol consumption if you’re a moderate to heavy drinker. You should also avoid sexual behaviors that increase your chances of viral infection — research has found a link between oral cancer and the viral infection caused by the sexually-transmitted human papilloma virus (HPV 16).

Improving your nutrition can also reduce your cancer risk. A diet rich in fresh fruits and vegetables supplies the body with cancer-fighting nutrients, including antioxidants that protect cells from damage caused by carcinogens. Studies have shown this kind of diet consistently lowers the risk of oral and throat cancer, as well as cancers of the esophagus, breast, prostate, lung and colon.

If you would like more information on oral cancer, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Oral Cancer.”

By Dr. Patrick Gallagher, D.D.S.
August 14, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: celebrity smiles   fluoride   floss  
FlossingAnImportantPartofTVDesignerNateBerkusOralHealthRoutine

As one of America's most beloved go-to guys for inspiration on the latest interior design trends, Nate Berkus has written a highly successful book, Home Rules: Transform the Place You Live Into a Place You'll Love; he is a contributing editor to O Magazine; and he is currently hosting his own television program, The Nate Berkus Show. He is also recognized for his eye-catching smile.

During a recent interview with Dear Doctor magazine, Berkus opened up about the facts behind his trademark smile. While his smile is all-natural — he never wore braces or had any cosmetic work done — he gives credit to his childhood dentist for the preventative healthcare he received as a young boy. “I'm grateful for having been given fluoride treatments and sealants as a child,” he said. Nate also shared the important flossing advice he learned from his dentist that he still follows today: “Floss the ones you want to keep.”

Why is flossing so important?

Flossing is crucial because it remains the most effective method for removing plaque from between teeth, where the toothbrush can't reach. It is also an important part of keeping your gums healthy so that you can avoid periodontitis (gum disease). You should floss at least once a day either before or after you brush your teeth. If you see blood after flossing, it may indicate that you have periodontitis, or it may mean that you are flossing too harshly. Remember, you need to use a delicate hand and a proper technique when brushing and flossing to avoid damaging your teeth and gums.

To learn more about flossing, including step-by-step instructions with photos, you can continue reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Flossing — A Different Approach.” Or you can contact us today to schedule an appointment so that we can conduct a thorough examination, review your brushing and flossing techniques, and discuss any questions you have as well as treatment options. As needed, we will work with you to teach you the proper brushing and flossing techniques so that you feel confident before you leave our office. And to read the entire interview with Nate Berkus, please see the Dear Doctor magazine article “Nate Berkus.”

By Dr. Patrick Gallagher, D.D.S.
August 01, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   nutrition  
TheSweetandLowdownonSugarSubstitutes

We’ve all heard about potentially negative health effects from the sugar that’s added to many of our favorite foods. So these days, lots of us are trying to cut down on our consumption of sugar — not only to lose weight, but also to help prevent maladies like diabetes and heart disease. We can’t help noticing those pastel-colored packets — pink, yellow and blue — on the rack of our favorite coffee shop. But now we’re wondering: Are those sugar substitutes a good alternative to natural sugar? And which one should we choose?

Artificial sweeteners have been around for decades. Six different types (including the ones in the colorful packets) are currently approved as safe by the Food and Drug Administration; a couple of older ones (notably cyclamates) have been banned for many years. In addition to those zero-calorie sugar substitutes, low-calorie sweeteners called sugar alcohols (for example, mannitol and xylitol) are often used as food ingredients. So what’s the difference between them — and which one is best?

That’s not so easy to answer. If you have a rare genetic condition called phenylketonuria, you should avoid aspartame (the blue packet), because your body can’t process the substance. Otherwise, the choice may come down to a matter of taste. Even though they are FDA-approved, some controversy (both fact-based and far-fetched) remains about the long-term safety of sugar substitutes, and their usefulness in preventing obesity and other diseases.

Yet it’s clear that for some people, the consequences of consuming too much sugar could be much worse. So if you’re at risk for diabetes or certain other diseases, sugar substitutes can be an important tool in maintaining a healthier diet. They also have another health benefit: sugar substitutes don’t cause cavities. Further, some sugar alcohols (xylitol in particular) have the property of stimulating saliva flow, and have been shown to actually impede the formation of cavities. Oral health is an important (if sometimes overlooked) component of your general well-being, and several studies have pointed to a link between oral and systemic diseases — for example, diabetes and heart disease.

As with so many aspects of our health, there seems to be no “magic bullet” to cure all our diet-related problems. But used in moderation, artificial sweeteners can be a valuable part of the effort to improve our overall health and well-being. For more information on this topic, see the Dear Doctor article “Artificial Sweeteners.”





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