Westminster, MD Dentist
Gallagher & Eden Family Dentistry
715 Baltimore Blvd.
Westminster, MD 21157
(410) 848-3866
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Westminster, MD 21157

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By Dr. Patrick Gallagher, D.D.S.
December 13, 2016
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: braces   orthodontics   Invisalign  

A lot of patients mistakenly assume that in order to get a straighter smile they have to get a standard braces treatment and wait years for invisalignresults. The truth of the matter is that you can have that better looking smile in just months with Invisalign. The office of Gallagher & Eden in Westminster, MD offers this revolutionary braces treatment to qualifying patients who are both smile-conscious and concerned about how long it will take to get a more attractive smile.

Wearing Traditional Braces
Although braces are the traditionally trusted solution for straightening smile imperfections, not every patient can tolerate the treatment period. Some patients have to wait two to three years to get the results they want. Patients who have mild to moderate orthodontic problems often prefer to perfect their smile with the help of Invisalign clear aligners.

What Is Invisalign?
Invisalign is a solution that gives patients straighter teeth in a shorter period of time compared to traditional braces. Instead of waiting up to three years, some patients can reveal their new smiles in as little as six months. The treatment utilizes clear plastic trays that are designed to align the teeth in a better position. With each tray prescribed by your Westminster dentist, your smile gets closer and closer to the ideal look.

A No-Hassle Solution
Because Invisalign aligners are removable, you can continue to live a no-hassle lifestyle. If you want to take off the aligners to eat or to have a close one-on-one conversation with someone, you can do that without a problem. There's no pain from metal brackets or no embarrassment when smiling or talking in social settings. 

See if Invisalign Is Your Ideal Solution
If your ultimate goal for your teeth is to have a straighter smile, you may find that that can be easily achieved by getting an Invisalign treatment. Call (410) 848-3866 today to schedule an appointment with a dentist at Gallagher & Eden in Westminster, MD.

By Dr. Patrick Gallagher, D.D.S.
November 25, 2016
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health  
DontLetanEatingDisorderWreckOralHealth

Eating disorders cause more than psychological harm. The binge-purge cycle of bulimia or the self-starvation patterns of anorexia can also injure the physical body, especially the mouth.

For example, nine in ten people with bulimia will experience tooth enamel erosion from stomach acid entering the mouth from induced vomiting. Although purging is less frequent with anorexic patients, one in five will also develop erosion.

An eating disorder isn't the only reason for enamel erosion: you can have high acid levels from over-consuming sodas, energy drinks or certain foods, or not properly brushing and flossing every day. But erosion related to an eating disorder does produce a distinct pattern in the teeth. When a person vomits, the tongue moves forward and presses against the bottom teeth, which somewhat shields them from acid contact. This can create less erosion in the lower front teeth than in others.

Eating disorders can cause other oral effects. Stomach acid contact can eventually burn and damage the mouth's soft tissues. The salivary glands may become enlarged and cause puffiness along the sides of the face. The use of fingers or other objects to induce gagging can injure and redden the back of the throat, the tongue and other soft tissues.

It's important to stop or at least slow the damage as soon as possible. To do so requires both a short– and long-term strategy. In the short-term, we want to neutralize mouth acid as soon as possible after it enters the mouth, especially after purging. Rather than brushing, it's better to rinse out the mouth with water or with a little added baking soda to neutralize the acid. This will at least help reduce the potential damage to enamel.

In the long-term, though, we need to address the disorder itself for the sake of both the person's overall well-being and their oral health. You can speak with us or your family physician about options for counseling and therapy to overcome an eating disorder. You may also find it helpful to visit the website for the National Eating Disorders Association (nationaleatingdisorders.org) for information and a referral network.

If you would like more information on how eating disorders can affect health, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Bulimia, Anorexia & Oral Health.”

By Dr. Patrick Gallagher, D.D.S.
November 10, 2016
Category: Oral Health
ActorDavidRamseyDiscussesBabyBottleToothDecay

Cavities can happen even before a baby has his first piece of candy. This was the difficult lesson actor David Ramsey of the TV shows Arrow and Dexter learned when his son DJ’s teeth were first emerging.

“His first teeth came in weak,” Ramsey recalled in a recent interview. “They had brown spots on them and they were brittle.” Those brown spots, he said, quickly turned into cavi­ties. How did this happen?

Ramsey said DJ’s dentist suspected it had to do with the child’s feedings — not what he was being fed but how. DJ was often nursed to sleep, “so there were pools of breast milk that he could go to sleep with in his mouth,” Ramsey explained.

While breastfeeding offers an infant many health benefits, problems can occur when the natural sugars in breast milk are left in contact with teeth for long periods.  Sugar feeds decay-causing oral bacteria, and these bacteria in turn release tooth-eroding acids. The softer teeth of a young child are particularly vulnerable to these acids; the end result can be tooth decay.

This condition, technically known as “early child caries,” is referred to in laymen’s terms as “baby bottle tooth decay.” However, it can result from nighttime feedings by bottle or breast. The best way to prevent this problem is to avoid nursing babies to sleep at night once they reach the teething stage; a bottle-fed baby should not be allowed to fall asleep with anything but water in their bottle or “sippy cup.”

Here are some other basics of infant dental care that every parent should know:

  • Wipe your baby’s newly emerging teeth with a clean, moist washcloth after feedings.
  • Brush teeth that have completely grown in with a soft-bristled, child-size toothbrush and a smear of fluoride toothpaste no bigger than a grain of rice.
  • Start regular dental checkups by the first birthday.

Fortunately, Ramsey reports that his son is doing very well after an extended period of professional dental treatments and parental vigilance.

“It took a number of months, but his teeth are much, much better,” he said. “Right now we’re still helping him and we’re still really on top of the teeth situation.”

If you would like more information on dental care for babies and toddlers, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “The Age One Dental Visit” and “Dentistry & Oral Health for Children.”

By Dr. Patrick Gallagher, D.D.S.
October 26, 2016
Category: Oral Health
Tags: mouth sores  
WecanMinimizeDiscomfortfromCankerSoreswithafewBasicTreatments

They seemingly pop up out of the blue inside your mouth: tiny sores that are sometimes painful — and always annoying. Then, in about a week to ten days these small, irritating lesions are gone.

They're known as canker sores: the most common break out in the linings of the mouth, including the cheeks, lips, under the tongue or even the back of the throat. Medically known as aphthous ulcers, you'll recognize these round lesions by their yellow-gray center surrounded by a red “halo.”

You might feel a tingling sensation a couple of days before an outbreak. Once they appear they usually last a week to ten days; during that time they can cause discomfort especially while eating or drinking.

We don't know fully what causes canker sores, but it's believed they're related to abnormalities in the immune system, the processes in the body that fight infection and disease. High stress or anxiety and certain acidic or spicy foods like citrus fruit or tomato sauce also seem to trigger them.

Most people experience canker sores that range in intensity from slight discomfort to sometimes severe pain. But about 20-25% of people, mostly women, have an acute form known as recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS). Thought to be hereditary, RAS produces clusters of ulcers that are almost always painful, and which come and go on a regular basis.

Our main treatment goal with canker sores is to decrease discomfort while the outbreak runs its course and promote rapid healing. There are over-the-counter ointments that often prove effective. For more resistant symptoms we can also prescribe topical or injectable steroids or other medications.

Canker sores are rarely concerning as a significant health issue. You should, however, take an outbreak seriously if it hasn't healed within two weeks, if the outbreaks seem to be increasing in frequency or severity, or you're never without a sore in your mouth. In these cases, we may need to take a tissue sample of the lesion to biopsy for signs of cancer, pre-cancer or some other skin disease.

More than likely, though, the canker sore will be benign albeit annoying. With effective treatment, though, you can get through the outbreak with only a minimal amount of discomfort.

If you would like more information on treating canker sores, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Mouth Sores.”

By Dr. Patrick Gallagher, D.D.S.
October 25, 2016
Category: Dental Procedures

Find out how this simple tooth-shaped cap can breathe life back into a damaged smile.

Dealing with a cracked or damaged tooth can feel frustrating. After all, now everyone can see that you have a less-than-perfect smile. It dental crownsmight sound ridiculous but your smile’s appearance can certainly play a large role in how good you feel about the way you look. Let our Westminster, MD dentist, Dr. Patrick Gallagher, helps boost your self-confidence with dental crowns.

With so many different and new dental restorations on the market you may have forgotten about dental crowns, but they really are a classic. There is a reason that our Westminster general dentist has been using them for so long. They are an amazingly easy way to save a damaged tooth and improve the health of your smile for years to come. A dental crown is custom-made to fit over the damaged tooth to treat issues caused by infection, trauma or severe decay.

Dental crowns are often used if a tooth is cracked, broken, chipped or worn down enough that the structure is no longer stable. A crown is designed to restore the tooth back to its full strength so you don’t have to worry about damaging your tooth further. Plus, crowns are designed to look just like natural teeth so they can also be a great option for a tooth that is severely malformed or discolored. While dental crowns are usually used to restore smiles they can also be used for purely aesthetic reasons, too.

Of course, before getting a dental crown the tooth has to be shaped properly in order for the crown to fit over the tooth. This means that enamel will need to be removed from your natural tooth. This is performed under local anesthesia, so you won’t feel a thing!

Then we will take impressions of your teeth. After all, the lab needs something from which to create your custom-made crown. Once your crown is made we will check the fit and your bite and then cement it into place. With the proper care a dental crown can last anywhere from 10-15 years (or more!).

Whether you have questions about dental crowns or you are dealing with dental pain, turn to the dental experts of Gallagher & Eden in Westminster, MD for the special, individualized care your smile deserves every time.





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